17 Jul

Integrative Health Care + Parkinson’s

what can I do for you? This is the third in a series this week.

Affecting nearly 200,000 Americans every year, Parkinson’s disease is another special condition that significantly interferes with a person’s daily living activities. Traditional treatments include dopamine boosters, antidepressants and antitremor medications. However, some new findings are showing that integrating massage therapy with some of the more traditional pharmacological approaches can be beneficial to people with Parkinson’s.

The Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease & Related Disorders has reaffirmed the value of integrative medicine with a 2018 study on therapeutic Thai massage (TTM). Splitting a total of 60 Parkinson’s patients, 30 who received six sessions of TTM in three weeks and 30 who received standard care, the study compared the muscle strength of the two groups. The findings were encouraging. “Our findings provide objective evidence that TTM used in combination with standard medical therapies is effective in improving upper limb muscle strength in patients with PD,” researchers explain.11

A survey done by the Department of Neurology at the University Medical Center Hamburg- Eppendorf furthered the claim that anti-parkinsonian drugs are incomplete without integrative therapies like massage. Of the 181 outpatients with Parkinson’s surveyed, only 33.6 percent found anti-parkinsonian drugs alone helpful. In contrast, 96.3 percent and 89.5 percent of participants found rehabilitative therapy and physiotherapy, both of which involve massage therapy, most effective.12 Once again, this suggests that massage can serve as an essential factor in the health care formula when practiced alongside other integrative approaches.

Additionally, a study done by Glasgow Caledonian in 2016 suggests abdominal massage can help with troublesome symptoms of Parkinson’s, like constipation.13

Research continues to show that an integrative approach to many chronic health conditions is not only effective, but resonates with the patients who are looking for ways to relieve some troublesome symptoms. For massage therapists, that is a big opportunity. “Simply put, traditional medicine can only do so much,” Tatninov believes. “It can only do so much for the pain that accompanies these diseases, such as the imbalances that come with scoliosis. Massage has a direct, immediate effect and can help fill in the holes in care.”

Jeana Anderson, C.N.H.P., LMT, CEIM, CBS

Natural Helping Hands, LLC

www.naturalhelpinghands.com

jeana@besmiley.com

501-690-3306 (I-phone)

16 Jul

Integrative Health Care + Arthritis

what can I do for you and your loved ones? This is the second in this week’s series. Watch for more each day.

Arthritis is one of the most common conditions in America, as well as one of the most painful. With symptoms that range from pain and swelling to reduced range of motion and stiffness, arthritis can seriously inhibit a person’s ability to maintain a normal or active lifestyle. Pain medications are often prescribed or purchased over-the-counter, but can have some side effects, like stomach upset, that can further impact daily living. New research, however, is showing that massage therapy may be the ideal nonpharmacological substitute.

The Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment conducted a systematic review of treatments for chronic pain, one of the key symptoms of arthritis. Their research indicates there is “strong scientific evidence” that massage reduces chronic pain by 20 to 30 percent more than treatment that does not involve physical movements.4

In 2018, a study by the Health Qualitative Research Center of Birjand University looked at the effects of aromatherapy massage with lavender essential oil on osteoarthritis, one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders. Results showed that after one week of treatment, the quality of daily life was increased significantly.Tatninov also sees success with aromatherapy, finding that for her clients with chronic pain conditions like arthritis or fibromyalgia, lavender and other oil blends can help with relaxation.

Additionally, numerous studies on osteoarthritis suggest that massage therapy can help with the pain involved in joint degeneration, as well as stiffness and function.6,7 One randomized controlled study found that participants who received an eight-week massage therapy intervention for symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee had significant improvement when compared to those who received usual care.8 A similar study of 125 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee showed that a one-hour course of massage given for eight weeks provided better pain relief than usual medical care.9 Even when compared to just exercise, researchers found that patients with knee arthritis pain who received massage therapy with exercise showed significant improvement on the pain scale, get-up-and-go test and the WOMAC index.10

Working with clients with chronic pain conditions, however, does require massage therapists to make some adjustments. According to Tatninov, some of her clients who have been receiving massage therapy for a time can handle and request deeper pressure, while others who are new to the practice may need a lighter touch. “I will check in more than I would with an average client to make sure the pressure I am using is comfortable,” she adds. 

Jeana Anderson, C.N.H.P., LMT, CEIM, CBS

Natural Helping Hands, LLC

www.naturalhelpinghands.com

jeana@besmiley.com

501-690-3306 (I-phone)

15 Jul

Integrative Health Care + Scoliosis

What can I do for you and your loved ones? The following article is just one. See my series this week for more.

Most commonly forming in adolescent years, scoliosis causes nagging back pain and fatigue. While these symptoms may sound minor, back pain and fatigue can mean that people are sometimes forced to miss opportunities for personal growth, like athletics or performing arts, as well as potentially having to give up some of their favorite hobbies. If not treated, scoliosis can persist for years, and in some cases, a lifetime.

In a study done by the Good Posture Association, the effect of consistent massage on Cobb angle, or the curve in the spine caused by idiopathic scoliosis, was analyzed. Thirtyminute treatment sessions, which involved soft tissue massage, were administered three times a week for eight weeks. “It was established that the Cobb angle was noticeably decreased after four weeks of the intervention,” researchers concluded.3

Cynthia Oberdier, a massage therapist from Columbus, Ohio, has significant experience treating clients with scoliosis. For Oberdier, focusing on the muscles around the spine is essential. “In my experience, massage for scoliosis is to encourage strengthening of the open side and lengthening of the shortened side,” explains Oberdier. “Massage strokes are then lengthwise to the short side with stretching to encourage opening of the curve. Myofascial release to the opposite side, encouraging myofascial unwinding and taking the tension off of the shortened side.”

Sonia D. Tatninov, a massage therapist from Tulena Wellness in Brooklyn, New York, says massage therapists working with clients with scoliosis should be prepared to do a lot of their work in side-lying position, and that many clients with scoliosis are going to need their neck worked. “I pay a lot of attention to the lamina groove,” she adds, “since I find that those with scoliosis tend to have a lot of holding at the attachments here.”

For clients with scoliosis, Tatninov also cautions massage therapists to talk with clients who have fusion and rods about how they affect their dayto- day life and range of motion. “These clients are often fine in supine positions, but I am always sure to have a sheet or towel handy to bolster their head,” she explains. “A client who has a rod may need to have their head bolstered to a very specific height.”

Similar to dementia, some of the biggest benefits of massage therapy surround its being able to be customized to individual needs. Tatninov emphasizes that clear communication is vital to providing proper treatment. “Those with severe scoliosis are often acutely aware of what’s going on in their bodies,” she says. “They are more than happy to give you a rundown of everything new going on in their body since they last saw you and to tell you specifically what they want the focus of the session to be that day. The best thing I can do for them is to listen to them and then plan that day’s session in response to the information they’ve given me on that day.”

Jeana Anderson, C.N.H.P., LMT, CEIM, CBS

Natural Helping Hands, LLC

www.naturalhelpinghands.com

jeana@besmiley.com

501-690-3306 (I-phone)


28 Jun

Who am I? I care about you!

Who am I? What do I do? How can I help you? What is health to you? How do you visualize your health? How much would you like to reduce your pain and stress? Please share my new “> Jeana

19 May

OPEN HOUSE (cancelled–see below)

JOIN US (due to flooding road issues, will reschedule at a later date. Stay well. I am safe by the way)

https://www.facebook.com/events/2407274372837317

#naturalhelp #naturalhelpinghands #naturalhelpopenhouse

Join the Jeana and Jaci at Natural Helping Hands for a celebration of better health through a holistic approach! This year, we open our doors and invite our clients and community to come learn more about what we do here at Natural Helping Hands. This is a non-ticketed event and is open to the public!

  • Meet with Jeana and Jaci. 
  • Learn more about Medical Massage Therapy.
  • Learn about Infant Massage Instruction.
  • Learn what Health Coaching and Holistic Nutrition is all about. 
  • See a sample Hair Mineral Analysis and how it can help you.
  • See what a test result looks like from the Biofeedback, stress reduction device.
  • Put your name in a drawing for a chance to win a free Medical Massage session and Health Coaching Session. 

2621 West Main Street, Suite 7, Russellville, AR 72025

Naturalhelp.net

501-690-3306

#medicalmassage #infantmassage #naturalhealth #crazyallergies #alphagal #holistichealth #holisticnutrition #russellvillelocal #russellvillear #healthcoaching #healthlivegive #holisticmud

13 Dec

Massage Is So Much More Than a Rub

I am sharing an article I ran across. I have added some of my own personal stuff to it.  I know it all too well.

Stress

Stress and anxiety is universal, and it’s not always bad. Whenever you jump to catch a badly thrown ball, feel especially energetic before an important meeting, or hit the brakes in time to avoid a car accident, stress is doing its job. The adrenaline boosting your heart rate and the cortisol boosting your blood sugar, while diverting energy away from your digestive system and immune responses, are exactly what humans need to fight or flee attackers.

However, when there’s never any relief from stress, the sustained fight-or-flight response can cause problems. In fact, WebMD warns that constant stress actually becomes “distress — a negative stress reaction. Distress can lead to physical symptoms including headaches, upset stomach, elevated blood pressure, chest pain, and problems sleeping. Research suggests that stress also can bring on or worsen certain symptoms or diseases.”

Following are some changes that can be brought about by stress:

BEHAVIOR CHANGES

    • Angry outbursts
    • Drug or alcohol abuse
    • Over- or under-eating
      • Social withdrawal
      • Tobacco use

MOOD CHANGES

    • Anxiety
    • Irritability or anger
    • Lack of motivation or focus
      • Restlessness
      • Sadness or depression

BODY CHANGES

    • Chest pain
    • Fatigue
    • Headache
    • Muscle tension or pain
    • Sex drive
      • Sleep
      • Stomach upset

Massage Therapy and Stress

Virtually every symptom listed by the American Psychological Association can benefit from massage. Research has shown that it can lower your heart rate and blood pressure, relax your muscles and increase the production of endorphins, your body’s natural “feel good” chemical. Serotonin and dopamine are also released through massage, and the result is a feeling of calm relaxation that makes chronic or habitual as well as acute or short-term stress much easier to overcome.  I personally know this to be true in every aspect with client results and with my own experiences.

In fact, stress relief is one of the first benefits that come to mind when thinking of massage therapy. It’s also a key component for anyone trying to achieve a healthier lifestyle. Clinical studies show that even a single 1 -hour session can significantly lower your heart rate, cortisol levels, and insulin levels – all of which explain why massage therapy and stress relief go hand-in-hand. 

Benefits of Massage Therapy for Stress

Taking care of your body should be at the top of your priorities. By adding therapeutic massage to your routine now, you’ll feel, look and simply be healthier far into the future. In fact, stress relief alone can improve your vitality and state of mind. So what better way to prep for a long, happy life than a relaxing, therapeutic massage?

If you’re looking to add stress-relieving massage to your wellness program, a therapeutic massage from Natural Helping Hands can be a powerful ally when combating daily pressures and anxiety. In addition to stress relief, ongoing massage therapy can reduce pain, increase energy levels and improve overall physical and mental performance. I am an experienced, professional, medical massage therapist who customizes every massage (and stress relief) session to address your individual needs. 

Give yourself, or someone you love, the gift of renewal by scheduling a “vacation” on my table.

Contact Me for more information