13 Dec

Massage Is So Much More Than a Rub

I am sharing an article I ran across. I have added some of my own personal stuff to it.  I know it all too well.

Stress

Stress and anxiety is universal, and it’s not always bad. Whenever you jump to catch a badly thrown ball, feel especially energetic before an important meeting, or hit the brakes in time to avoid a car accident, stress is doing its job. The adrenaline boosting your heart rate and the cortisol boosting your blood sugar, while diverting energy away from your digestive system and immune responses, are exactly what humans need to fight or flee attackers.

However, when there’s never any relief from stress, the sustained fight-or-flight response can cause problems. In fact, WebMD warns that constant stress actually becomes “distress — a negative stress reaction. Distress can lead to physical symptoms including headaches, upset stomach, elevated blood pressure, chest pain, and problems sleeping. Research suggests that stress also can bring on or worsen certain symptoms or diseases.”

Following are some changes that can be brought about by stress:

BEHAVIOR CHANGES

    • Angry outbursts
    • Drug or alcohol abuse
    • Over- or under-eating
      • Social withdrawal
      • Tobacco use

MOOD CHANGES

    • Anxiety
    • Irritability or anger
    • Lack of motivation or focus
      • Restlessness
      • Sadness or depression

BODY CHANGES

    • Chest pain
    • Fatigue
    • Headache
    • Muscle tension or pain
    • Sex drive
      • Sleep
      • Stomach upset

Massage Therapy and Stress

Virtually every symptom listed by the American Psychological Association can benefit from massage. Research has shown that it can lower your heart rate and blood pressure, relax your muscles and increase the production of endorphins, your body’s natural “feel good” chemical. Serotonin and dopamine are also released through massage, and the result is a feeling of calm relaxation that makes chronic or habitual as well as acute or short-term stress much easier to overcome.  I personally know this to be true in every aspect with client results and with my own experiences.

In fact, stress relief is one of the first benefits that come to mind when thinking of massage therapy. It’s also a key component for anyone trying to achieve a healthier lifestyle. Clinical studies show that even a single 1 -hour session can significantly lower your heart rate, cortisol levels, and insulin levels – all of which explain why massage therapy and stress relief go hand-in-hand. 

Benefits of Massage Therapy for Stress

Taking care of your body should be at the top of your priorities. By adding therapeutic massage to your routine now, you’ll feel, look and simply be healthier far into the future. In fact, stress relief alone can improve your vitality and state of mind. So what better way to prep for a long, happy life than a relaxing, therapeutic massage?

If you’re looking to add stress-relieving massage to your wellness program, a therapeutic massage from Natural Helping Hands can be a powerful ally when combating daily pressures and anxiety. In addition to stress relief, ongoing massage therapy can reduce pain, increase energy levels and improve overall physical and mental performance. I am an experienced, professional, medical massage therapist who customizes every massage (and stress relief) session to address your individual needs. 

Give yourself, or someone you love, the gift of renewal by scheduling a “vacation” on my table.

Contact Me for more information

17 Sep

Stealth-type Microbes That Can be Transmitted by Ticks

I found the following information from Dr. Bill Rawls very informative.

Over several years of persistent effort, I was able to recover my health completely — the things that I learned along the way changed my life forever. My struggle with chronic Lyme disease taught me things that most other physicians do not know. I now use that knowledge to help others understand and overcome this often frustrating illness.

 

Borrelia, the Misunderstood Microbe

Retrospectively, I may have harbored Borrelia burgdorferi (the microbe that causes Lyme disease) for years before I actually developed symptoms. I’m an outdoor person; tick bites have always been an everyday affair.

It’s not uncommon for people to harbor Borrelia and not know it; stealth is this microbe’s middle name.

Lyme disease is mostly transmitted by nymphal ticks, which are about the size of the pin. They bite, transmit the microbe, and then drop off — most people aren’t even aware of being bitten. Because symptoms of the initial infection are so mild (if they occur at all), it’s not uncommon for people to be completely unaware of being infected.

And Borrelia isn’t the only microbe to worry about. Ticks carry many microbes that have similar characteristics to Borrelia. What they all have in common is stealthy characteristics that make them hard to find–and even harder to get rid of.

If immune system function is robust, a person can harbor these types of microbes indefinitely without ever having symptoms. When illness does occur, it’s typically chronic and debilitating, but not life-threatening. Additionally, the degree of chronic illness is highly variable. Some people are severely debilitated, while others are only marginally miserable.

What You Need to Know About Borrelia

  • Borrelia rarely causes life-threatening illness, but it can make you desperately miserable for a lifetime.
  • There are 20 known species of Borrelia that can cause human illness (not just Borrelia burgdorferi), and it is not uncommon for people with Lyme disease to harbor at least two species.
  • Beyond Borrelia, there are hundreds of species of stealth-type microbes that can be transmitted by ticks. Mycoplasma and Bartonella are the most common, but there are many many others. Most everyone on the planet harbors some stealth microbes without knowing it.
  • All these factors make Lyme disease extremely difficult to diagnose; lab tests are notoriously unreliable, especially in chronic illness.
  • Because Borrelia is so difficult to diagnose and can be harbored without causing symptoms, no one really knows how many asymptomatic carriers there are worldwide.

Read more – How I Recovered from Fibromyalgia & Lyme by Dr. Bill Rawls